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   These are a few of the stories you will find in this week's printed newspaper:

  • Townhalls attract crowds: Assemblyman Brian Dahle and Sen. Ted Gaines met with constituents in Quincy and Chester during a three-meeting swing through Plumas and Lassen counties.
  • New leader: After nearly three decades, the Plumas County Mental Health Commission has a new leader. Supervisor Kevin Goss was named to replace Hank Eisenmann.
  • Home away from home: As of last week, new homes had been found for all of the patients at Quincy Nursing & Rehabilitation and most had already moved.

School board selects a new trustee

 PUSD Leslie
Leslie Edlund, foreground, interviews with the Plumas Unified School District governing board to become its newest trustee during a special meeting Nov. 1. Edlund will replace Betty Moura whose term ends this month. PUSD Superintendent Micheline Miglis, left, and her assistant Patty McCutcheon listen as a school board member poses a question. Photo by Debra Moore

Plumas Unified School District’s newest trustee is the mother of two school-age children, a leading force in Quincy’s 7-11 committee, a five-year president of the elementary school’s parent cooperative, a classroom volunteer and fundraiser. She also works part-time for the Forest Service.

  “Being on the governing board takes a substantial amount of time … how will this time commitment impact your life?”

  That was the 13th and final question asked of Quincy resident Leslie Edlund during a special school board meeting Nov. 1. Edlund was the sole applicant to succeed Betty Moura, whose term on the school board ends this month.

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Time to put down the gun; Local investigator retires after 40 years

  On her first day of retirement, Linda Patton enjoyed breakfast in bed and watched the “Today” show — both real treats for this Quincy woman who has spent the past 40 years waking up and going to work for Plumas County, the last 20 as its welfare fraud investigator.

  “I loved my job, but I was just ready,” Patton said of her decision to retire.

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Reduce, reuse, recycle — this newspaper!

Recycling allxaIngrid Burke
Copy Editor
11/7/2012
 

  America Recycles Day is next Thursday, Nov. 15, and this is a perfect time to think about your recycling and sustainability habits. Are you incorporating the “reduce, reuse, recycle” mantra in your daily life? You bet you are, just by reading this newspaper!

  If you toss this paper into a recycling bin when you’re done with it instead of a garbage can, you’re saving trees and landfill space. But by buying the paper in the first place, you’re also providing a market for recycled goods: All Feather Publishing Co. newspapers are printed on paper with 40 percent or more recycled content. This is essential, because without a way to keep recycled materials in the production chain, recycling doesn’t do any good.

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All Plumas schools are open Friday

Feather Publishing
11/9/2012
6:30 a.m.
 

Plumas Unified School District called Feather Publishing this morning and advised that all schools including Quincy, Greenville, Chester and Portola will start on time this morning.

 

Buses in most areas will be chained up and running at the maximum of 35 MPH allowed on the highways under chain restrictions. Students in those areas may notice small delays.

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Wild turkeys make their fall debut

 Wild turkeys
Wild turkeys are fair game for hunters through Dec. 9 this year, and the season limit is two. The Department of Fish and Game warns residents not to contribute to problem behaviors by feeding wild turkeys. Photo by Alicia Knadler
Feather Publishing
11/7/2012
 
With shorter days and a chilly nip in the air, we know fall has arrived and winter is not too far off.

As the season changes, so do the habits of wildlife. Bears stock up on calories for winter hibernation, birds migrate to warmer climates and wild turkeys seem to come out in droves.

While these wild game birds may seem harmless and approachable, they can cause problems. Many homeowners can’t resist feeding them. What starts out as innocent fun can become a nuisance if the birds start destroying flower and vegetable gardens, leaving their droppings on patios and decks or roosting on cars where they may scratch the paint.

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