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California Outdoors for the week of 11/1/2013

Carrie Wilson
California Department of Fish and Wildlife

 

Fishing for manta rays

Question: Is it legal to fish for manta rays in California, specifically in the San Francisco Bay area?

Gina T.

Answer: Manta rays are generally not found off California, and since they are filter feeders, it may be difficult to persuade one to take your bait. The northernmost limit of their range in the eastern Pacific Ocean is around San Diego, where they are only spotted occasionally. However, if a manta ray were to stray farther north, then yes, it may be legally taken by hook and line off California. I suspect you instead may be referring to bat rays, which are more widely distributed and caught fairly regularly on hook and line. If so, they too are legal to take.

 

California lizardfish

Question: Please verify for me the catch limit on California lizardfish. My understanding is the limit is 10 fish/species with a total bag limit of 20 fish of all species. Right? I don’t see this species mentioned as one of the “no limit” species. Lizardfish are being caught four – five at a time on the piers on the Central Coast and someone is telling the anglers there is no limit.

Rose H.

Santa Barbara

Answer: You are correct. A bag limit of up to 10 lizardfish per angler is allowed. There are no size or season restrictions for these fish, though.

 

Polar bear rug

Question: I’ve inherited a white polar bear rug that has been in the family for 30 – 40 years. I have no papers or receipts for it. Can I still sell it?

Christian P.

Tulare

Answer: No. Fish and Game Code section 4758 prohibits the sale of any bear parts, even if the bear is not native to California. Violations are prosecuted as felonies.

 

Big game baiting

Question: I have a question regarding the “baiting” of big game. In the Mammal Hunting Regulations booklet on page 12 it says:

“257.5. Prohibition Against Taking Resident Game Birds and Mammals by the Aid of Bait.

Except as otherwise provided in these regulations or in the Fish and Game Code, resident game birds and mammals may not be taken within 400 yards of any baited area.

“(a) Definition of Baited Area. As used in this regulation, “baited area” shall mean any area where shelled, shucked or unshucked corn, wheat or other grains, salt, or other feed whatsoever capable of luring, attracting, or enticing such birds or mammals is directly or indirectly placed, exposed, deposited, distributed, or scattered, and such area shall remain a baited area for ten days following complete removal of all such corn, wheat or other grains, salt, or other feed.”

Does this also prohibit aerosol attractants? An aerosol is not considered feed but it is “capable of luring, attracting or enticing.” In the regulations it does not specifically prohibit non-feed attractants.

Ken M.

Answer: This section (California Code of Regulations Title 14, section 257.5) prohibits the use of any feed (real or artificial) that is capable of attracting an animal to an area, andwhen the attractant used causes the animalto feed (on the substance), it is prohibited. Generally, aerosols sprayed into the air are permissible because there is nothing to feed on. But the same products applied to a surface (e.g., tree, brush, rock, etc.) where the animal licks, eats, chews, nibbles, etc., the surfaceis considered feedand is a violation.

Intentional acts that disrupt any birds’ or mammals’normal behavior patterns (CCR Title 14, section 251.1) and feeding big game mammals (CCR Title 14, section 251.3) are also prohibited.

For the complete regulations, go to dfg.ca.gov/regulations to find the California Mammal Hunting Regulations for 2013-14.

 

Electric fishing reels

Question: Are electric fishing reels allowed in the state of California?

John M.

Answer: Yes. Nothing in the Fish and Game Code prohibits the use of electric fishing reels manufactured for sport fishing. Acceptable fishing methods and gear restrictions can be found in section 2.00 of the Freshwater Regulations booklet and 28.70(a)(3) in the Ocean Sport Fishing Regulations booklet, available online at dfg.ca.gov/regulations or wherever fishing licenses are sold.

 

Carrie Wilsonis a marine environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week in this column. Contact her at Cal.Outdoors@wildlife.ca.gov.

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