A collaborative mural greets visitors to Artopolis at the Art to Ag Plumas Sierra Fair. Photos by Mari Erin Roth

Art to Ag fair runs in full color

Jade Kennedy, age 12, and her brother Duncan Kennedy, age 15, polish the horns of their goats for show in the big agriculture arena Aug. 10.

The Minerva Fire smoke is still in the air, but the Plumas Sierra County Art to Ag 2017 fair was able to get under way Aug. 9. The brand new entry gate from Fairgrounds Road welcomed fairgoers.

Artopolis was a huge hit with free portraits, live music, art opportunities for the masses, along with seven murals being painted on-site during the run of the fair.

Carnival rides were a big draw with crowds and lines for the bright lights lasting until closing time each night.

The barns were full of fine examples of 4H livestock and productive youngsters were on hand to tell the tales of raising and caring for their fair animals.

Brother and sister Jade and Duncan Kennedy of Calpine were enjoying their first year participating in the 4H livestock competitions at the Art to Ag fair.

“I’ve had fun with it,” said 12-year-old Jade. “The hard part is training.”

Brother Duncan throws in a fun fact while he applied petroleum jelly to the horns of his charge, “Goat is the most widely eaten meat in the world, not here in the U.S., but in the world.”

The kid’s mom, Jennifer, got “roped” into being the project leader. “None of the group knew anything about goats when they began, but they are learning,” said Jennifer.

Participating in the agriculture projects “teaches lots of responsibility,” said Grace Bristol, who has raised sheep for five years for the fair.

Owen Joseph of Greenville brought his hog to the fair. After five years of participation in 4H hog events, Joseph said he wanted to go into the army out of high school. He has been saving the money he earns with the hogs to buy a “new” car. He is really thinking ahead as he gets his drivers permit next August.