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Native plant enthusiasts meeting set

Feather Publishing
8/23/2014

Ever wonder what that plant along the side of the road is? An upcoming meeting will connect folks with a shared interest in native plants.

The introductory meeting is set for Wednesday, Aug. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Quincy library, 445 Jackson St.

“Why learn about native plants?” asks organizer David Popp. “They are all around us and most of us do not know about them or how they live.

“The native plants of California are unlike any others in the world. We have a unique climate that selects which plants can live here.”

The Mediterranean climate of Plumas County is characterized generally by wet winters and dry summers. Because of local mountain terrain, the full effects of the Mediterranean climate are tempered with more precipitation and exaggerated by a rain-shadow effect, creating a desert-like climate to the far east of the county where sagebrush elements start to appear and then dominate.

“Native plants are adapted to use less water and are a good choice for landscaping,” said Popp. “They generally require less maintenance because they are adapted to the local environment, resulting in little if any fertilizer use and time taking care of them.”

Native plants have also developed their own defenses against many pests and diseases. Wildlife like birds, butterflies, beneficial insects, reptiles and mammals gravitate to them because they have “grown up together through time” and have adapted “like they were made for each other.” Native plants support the environment by providing habit for each other and other organisms.

“We have a great diversity of over 6,000 species in California with over 2,186 documented in Plumas County — with still more to be found,” said Popp.

“If you hear the wildflowers calling your name, you should show up at the Quincy library Aug. 27.”

The meeting provides an introduction to link together people and resources that have a curiosity in native plants.

“Come connect with local people of common interest to share knowledge and learn,” said Popp. “Help plan field walks and other events.”


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