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   These are a few of the stories you will find in this week's printed newspaper:

  • Lucky dog: After eight harrowing days lost in the Plumas National Forest, a missing Shetland sheepdog was found. He was hungry, tired, cold, scratched, limping on bloody paws and missing some fur. But his tail was wagging.
  • On trial: The trial for a Quincy man accused of inflicting fatal injuries on a toddler in 2013 is scheduled to begin March 12.
  • Moving on: Just days after Plumas District Hospital announced that it couldn’t take over Quincy Nursing & Rehabilitation, several residents of the facility have found new homes.

Leaky sewer pond to be abandoned

Alicia Knadler
Indian Valley Editor
10/27/2010

 

The sewer pond that leaked thousands of gallons of effluent into Wolf Creek this summer will be abandoned.

Chief operator Jim Hamblin reported this to directors of the Indian Valley Community Services District Wednesday, Oct. 13.

The first tests of Wolf Creek showed higher fecal contamination levels below the ponds than above, and additional tests are being made throughout the surrounding area near the sewer ponds.

Four different samplings over time are being taken, with the last tests due in early November.

State water quality control agents toured the Greenville sewer ponds in September, including the area where a passerby detected the leak in July.

In their report, they asked for the pond not to be used again, so Hamblin has created a plan to bypass that pond completely.

A nearby resident wondered if rainwater would carry even more contamination through the leak into the creek.

Hamblin didn’t think it would be much, if so, though he did acknowledge the possibility.

As reported previously, health concerns were allayed somewhat when Indian Valley Medical Clinic manager John Evans said there had been no spike or significant change in the number of episodes of stomach disorders this summer.

Exposure to fecal contaminated water could cause a number of illnesses, according to nurse Amanda Higgins of the Plumas County health Agency, some serious, and most of which include digestive upsets, like diarrhea, nausea, cramps and vomiting.

Another update will be published after the testing information is released to the public.


1997 NEW YEARS FLOOD VIDEO in Plumas County is now available on DVD. We’ve completely re-mastered from the original tapes all of the exciting footage that inspired the first video-tape. See the damage beyond the roadblocks. Featuring: The Feather River Canyon flooding, Two Rivers washout, Sloat Bridge, Dog Rock washout, Indian Valley flooding, Quincy and American Valley flooding. To order your copy, send a check or money order for $20 to Kevin Mallory, PO Box 1785, Quincy, CA 95971 and include your name, phone and return address information. Or call (530) 283-0150. Includes tax and shipping.

 


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