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   These are a few of the stories you will find in this week's printed newspaper:

  • Not guilty plea: The man charged with first-degree murder in the December, 2014, death of a Greenville woman pleaded not guilty last week.
  • More Jefferson talk: Proponents of the state of Jefferson packed the Board of Supervisors room for the third time April 14, but once again did not walk away with the county’s support.
  • School cuts: The Plumas Unified School District is facing a $3 million budget deficit for the next school year, which will result in funding cuts in many areas.

Winter SnowFest comes to Eastern Plumas County

  The third annual Winter SnowFest this weekend, Feb. 15 – 17, has snowballed its way into Eastern Plumas County, bringing with it an avalanche of activities and events for the public to enjoy.

  After much preparation and many hours of work, the Graeagle-Plumas Alliance expects this year’s SnowFest to be the most successful to date.

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Read more: Winter SnowFest comes to Eastern Plumas County

Man charged with arson, assaulting an officer has Feb. 22 court date

  The man charged with assaulting a police officer and then starting a fire in the jail is scheduled to appear in Plumas County Superior Court in Quincy on Feb. 22.

  Richard Allen Edmiston, 26, of Quincy, will also have a new public defender. Attorney Robert Zernich was appointed to represent Edmiston on Friday, Feb. 8, after attorney Bill Abramson declared a conflict of interest.

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Read more: Man charged with arson, assaulting an officer has Feb. 22 court date

Forest Service plans deer habitat improvement burn

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The Sloat deer herd ranges north to Moonlight Valley, west to Meadow Valley and south to Graeagle. Key wintering areas are in American, Genesee and Indian valleys as well as the Middle Fork Feather River. Photo courtesy Plumas National Forest
ther Publishing
2/14/2013

  If weather and fuel conditions are just right, Forest Service firefighters will use fire to improve the brush, grasses and other vegetation used for food by deer and other wildlife in the Mount Hough State Game Refuge on the Plumas National Forest.

  “Fire gets rid of the dense, tough older vegetation and causes plants to sprout, providing access and tender, more nutritious food for the animals in the area,” said Mount Hough District Ranger Mike Donald. In addition, the area will be more “fire safe” should a wildfire start below or within the treated area.

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FRC appoints new superintendent/president

  The Feather River College board of trustees announced the appointment of Dr. Kevin Trutna as superintendent/president of the college, pending final contract negotiations.

  The decision was announced Feb. 6. Trutna, interim president at Feather River College and Yuba Community College District, has 23 years’ experience in higher education.

  He assumed the helm from outgoing president Ron Taylor on Aug. 6, 2012.

  An updated report will be featured in next week’s Feather Publishing newspapers.

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Fire department equipment donations play important role

 {sfh} FireEngine|300|150|19|3|0.3|0|0|0|0|0|14|0|1 |center|1|0|5|0|0{/sfh}
Before:The Quincy fire department’s new acquisition, a U.S. Forest Service surplus fire engine, is 19 years old.
After: Quincy mechanic Charlie Read and volunteer Capt. John Gay pause in front of the rebuilt engine, which features upgrades inside and out.
Feather Publishing
2/13/2013
 

  Many Plumas County fire departments benefit from a wide range of equipment donations or loans from other agencies. These transfers have been going on for many decades, and help to provide important tools for local volunteer firefighters that would otherwise be cost-prohibitive. Combined with occasional grant awards from government or private sources, these programs all play a very important role in providing modern fire services.

  The annual budgets for 17 of our 19 community fire departments range from about $20,000 to several hundred thousand dollars a year. Almost all of the fire departments are fully volunteer, with the exception of a few with larger budgets, such as the Chester and Peninsula fire departments, which have some career staffers. Some of the 19, such as Quincy, have a full- or part-time fire chief.

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Read more: Fire department equipment donations play important role


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