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   These are a few of the stories you will find in this week's printed newspaper:

  • Lucky dog: After eight harrowing days lost in the Plumas National Forest, a missing Shetland sheepdog was found. He was hungry, tired, cold, scratched, limping on bloody paws and missing some fur. But his tail was wagging.
  • On trial: The trial for a Quincy man accused of inflicting fatal injuries on a toddler in 2013 is scheduled to begin March 12.
  • Moving on: Just days after Plumas District Hospital announced that it couldn’t take over Quincy Nursing & Rehabilitation, several residents of the facility have found new homes.

College approved to offer bachelor’s degree

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The California Chancellor’s Office announced last week FRC will be one of 15 community colleges in the state to offer a bachelor’s degree program. Photo by James Wilson
James Wilson
Staff Writer
1/31/2015



Feather River College will soon be more than a steppingstone on the path to a four-year degree. It’ll be the final destination.

The California Chancellor’s Office announced Jan. 20 that it approved 15 community colleges to offer four-year degrees, and FRC was on the list.

“We are thrilled to have this opportunity for our students and the school,” said FRC Dean of Instruction Derek Lerch. “There is a long list of unresolved details that we’ll work quickly to address in the coming months.”
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Read more: College approved to offer bachelor’s degree

Judge sacks court’s drug-treatment program


Kaufman says clients aren’t getting the services they need to succeed
Dan McDonald
Managing Editor
1/30/2015



Relations between the Plumas County Mental Health Department and the county’s criminal justice leaders suffered another setback last week.

Superior Court Judge Ira Kaufman announced Wednesday, Jan. 21, that he was no longer sentencing people to drug court. He said he was ending the program because clients weren’t being served. Add a comment

Read more: Judge sacks court’s drug-treatment program

Altes arraignment continued to Feb. 27

Dan McDonald
Managing Editor
1/30/2015


The arraignment of William Leo Altes III, the man accused of killing Greenville resident Lauren Allen, was continued for the third time last week.

Altes is scheduled to enter a plea Feb. 27 in Plumas County Superior Court in Quincy. Add a comment

Read more: Altes arraignment continued to Feb. 27

Quincy nursing home slated for closure; Local leaders look for options to keep it open


“There is an urgent need for a cooperative effort in our community to save our nursing home.”

Dr. Ross Morgan
Medical Director
Quincy Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
Debra Moore
Staff Writer
1/29/2015


Local healthcare leaders learned last week that the skilled nursing hospital in Quincy is slated for closure, which would result in the relocation of more than three dozen patients and the loss of 60 jobs. 

“There is an urgent need for a cooperative effort in our community to save our nursing home,” said Dr. Ross Morgan, the facility’s medical director. 

Denise Huggins, the manager of Quincy Nursing & Rehabilitation, received notification Jan. 14 that the nursing home’s parent company planned to close the facility due to financial losses. The facility has gone by a number of different names over the years, and was known as Country Villa from November of 2007 to the end of March 2014. The licensee of the facility is CF Quincy, LLC.

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Read more: Quincy nursing home slated for closure; Local leaders look for options to keep it open

Plumas Audubon Society to present on local birds at MCRC Speakers Bureau

 
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Jerry Williams assists researchers in their tracking of the rough-legged hawk. Photos courtesy Plumas Audubon Society
Feather Publishing
1/29/2015
 

Plumas County is a rich and diverse area that is home to many animals. Because the county has little development and numerous lakes and waterways, the area naturally attracts a wide variety of birds and is an area of interest to birders and wildlife enthusiasts, many of whom travel here specifically to observe them.

This diversity of birds is part of what makes the county unique and a great place to live and visit. Some of the birds that visit the area are rare — migratory birds that return year after year from exotic places across thousands of miles of ocean and land. Even in winter there are many species of birds that call Plumas County home.

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Read more: Plumas Audubon Society to present on local birds at MCRC Speakers Bureau


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