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Reading Fire 8/21/2012 update

Feather Publishing
8/21/2012
7:00 a.m. update

The Reading Fire is 27,887 acres and is now 79% contained.

Click here to view the most recent map.

Yesterday, the fire held within all lines on the fire. Firefighters continue to hold, patrol and mop up. Firelines were completed on the eastern part of the fire. With strong southwest winds, the eastern perimeter may be exposed to winds that may challenge these firelines. Fire fighters on these lines will be keeping a watchful eye on the line and outside the fireline so they can quickly respond to flare up or hotspots. Along the southern and eastern flanks helicopters were used to extinguish hot spots and support crews.

Crews will continue repairing the Pacific Crest Trail and other areas impacted by fire suppression. Minimum Impact Suppression Techniques are being utilized within the park. Crews are prepared for initial attack in Lassen Volcanic National Park and are available for structure protection. Snag removal will continue on the Lassen Volcanic National Park Highway.

Crews are actively involved in backhaul operations on the northwest section of the fire. While firefighters make the final push towards containment of the Reading Fire, they must fulfill another extremely important task. Firefighters must be on the lookout for equipment in the field that is no longer needed by the crews that fought the fire. The Reading Fire is no exception. The list of equipment that must be retrieved includes; hose, pump kits; generators; chainsaw kits; collapsible water tanks; trash; and smaller items such as hose fittings and nozzles. To gather these items, firefighters will GPS the location of equipment and then crews are sent out to backhaul these items. Recovered and returned equipment must then be cleaned, repaired, and organized to be ready for the next incident.

The objectives of public and firefighter safety and keeping the fire within its current perimeter are priorities The addition of increased winds and lower relative humidity may impact fire behavior and crews will be responding to any spot fires.

The foremost objective in fire operations is to provide for firefighter and public safety. A wide array of tools and technology are used by experienced fire management to corral wildfire.Accurate mapping is an essential fire support tool and takes many formats and scales. Map products include: tactical and strategic planning, aerial reconnaissance, identification of hazards (overhead wires, mine shafts, illegal dumps, etc.),growth perimeter maps by day, damage inventories, jurisdictional and ownership boundaries, transportation access routes and closures.Maps are derived from a variety of sources depending upon intended use and accuracy required. Generally, base maps are developed from current aerial and satellite photography. Both contour maps and flat base maps are used depending upon specific need.

Today, smoke and operations from the Reading Fire and nearby fires, The Chips and the Ponderosa may present driving hazards. Drive slowly when visibility is low, and be cautious around emergency vehicles.

Many local, county, state and federal agencies are working together to provide a coordinated response to the fire. Smoke will continue to pose health concerns for the public. Residents are encouraged to visit the "Protect Yourself from Smoke" website for smoke protection information at http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Wildfires/. Local air quality conditions and forecasts are available at http://airnow.gov.

Visitors wanting to access Lassen National Volcanic Park from the north, can drive the Lassen Volcanic National Park Highway from the north entrance to Manzanita Lake. Visitors wanting to access the park from the south entrance, the road is open to Summit Lake. Visitors are encouraged to call ahead for current information. The park's most popular trails remain open. From the Southwest entrance, visitors can access the Bumpass Hell trail, Kings Creek Falls trail, Mill Creek Falls, and Brokeoff Mountain trail among others. Warner Valley offers visitors an opportunity to hike several trails including the trails to Devils Kitchen and Boiling Springs Lake, two of the park's hydrothermal areas. The Lassen Peak trail will be open to the summit Friday August 31 through Monday September 3. Visitors can enjoy a spectacular full moon hike up the peak on August 31. The trails around Manzanita Lake, Lily Pond, Crags Lake and Manzanita Creek are open in the northwest part of the park. The Pacific Crest Trail is closed.

Closures - Lassen Volcanic National Park

Campgrounds:

  • Butte Lake
  • Crags
  • Lost Creek
  • Summit Lake North
  • Summit Lake South

Roads:

Visitors are encouraged to contact Lassen Volcanic National Park prior to visiting for current conditions. Visitors wanting to access Lassen National Volcanic Park from the north, can drive the Lassen Volcanic National Park Highway from the north entrance to Manzanita Lake. Visitors may access the park from the south entrance. The road is open to Summit Lake. Visitors are encouraged to call ahead for current information. Many of the park's most popular trails remain open. The Lassen Volcanic National Highway is closed from Manzanita Campground to Summit Lake Campground.

For additional information, please visit:

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