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   These are a few of the stories you will find in this week's printed newspaper:

  • New state: Proponents of the state of Jefferson pushed the Plumas County Board of Supervisors to sign a declaration of support Jan. 20, but they didn’t get it.
  • Nursing home to close: Healthcare leaders learned that the skilled nursing hospital in Quincy is slated for closure, which would result in the relocation of more than three dozen patients and the loss of 60 jobs.
  • Program sacked: Judge Ira Kaufman is no longer sentencing people to drug court. He said he was ending the program because clients weren’t being served.

Fire departments, emergency medical services have long association

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An American Fire Zouave ambulance crew demonstrates battlefield removal of wounded soldiers. Photo courtesy Library of Congress
Feather Publishing
11/24/2014

 

Why does your local fire department respond if you need emergency medical care? Why do they usually come with a fire engine in addition to the ambulance? Ever wonder what an “EMT” is? How about a “first responder”? And what about a “paramedic”? How do our local firefighters fit into these roles in Plumas County? And, perhaps the most important question, why is your local fire department even providing this service?

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Dignitaries descend on Quincy


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Members of the new Plumas Historic Lodge gather after the Nov. 10 ceremony, which officially made it the first historical lodge in the state. Back row, from left: Dennis Scovell, Dick Andrews, Jim Hedin, Bill Whitcher, Bill Tiner and Skip Hansen. Front row, from left: Larry Marsh, Dick Jolley and Dick Dykes. Photo submitted
Debra Moore
Staff Writer
11/23/2014

Masonic lodge receives new designation declaring it historic


Masonic leaders from across the state gathered to celebrate history in the making Nov. 10 when the Quincy lodge became the first in the state to become a “historic” lodge.

Some of the visiting Masons had been in Sacramento to oversee the laying of the cornerstone for the new Kings arena, and then continued the journey north.

The dignitaries, local Masons and their wives enjoyed a dinner served by the Rainbow Girls before proceeding upstairs for the ceremony. Add a comment

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Hospital seeks another surgeon

Surgeon-gone
Dr Mark Williams
Debra Moore
Staff Writer
11/22/2014

Plumas District Hospital and its newest surgeon have agreed to a mutual separation.

Dr. Mark Williams, who is also under contract with Eastern Plumas Health Care, will no longer be seeing patients at the Quincy facility.

“He and I are on amiable terms,” Chief Executive Officer Jeff Kepple said of Williams.

Kepple can’t discuss the reasons for the separation, but reiterated that it was mutually agreed upon. Williams’ planned procedures have been rescheduled. Add a comment

Read more: Hospital seeks another surgeon

Whole lotta shakin’ goin’ on!

Earthquake
There are no indications a Lassen Peak eruption may be on the horizon, but last week the area near the southern most volcano in the Cascades experienced a swarm of earthquake activity. File photo
Sam Williams
Staff Writer
11/22/2014

Just after everyone’s attention focused on an earthquake swarm in Northwestern Nevada, a new earthquake swarm hit closer to home just beyond the boundary of Lassen Volcanic National Park.

According to a Wednesday, Nov. 12, email from Dr. Margaret T. Mangan, the scientist in charge of the California Volcano Observatory, the agency is “tracking an earthquake swarm located at the Tehama County-Plumas County border within Lassen National Forest. The swarm is about 24 kilometers west-northwest of the town of Chester and about 1 mile south of the Lassen Volcanic National Park boundary near the Twin Meadows Trail at Patricia Lake.”
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Minor earthquake felt in Quincy

Feather Publishing
11/21/2014
 
A minor earthquake rocked the Quincy area Friday at 7:49 a.m.  The U.S. Geological Survey reported the magnitude 3.5 earthquake was centered 11 miles east-northeast of Quincy.  Those who felt the quake reported feeling a short and somewhat sharp jolt rather than the longer rolling sensation often associated with earthquakes.  Quakes of this size do not normally cause any damage.
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