Not a good year to let a property go to the weeds. A fire hydrant in the area known as “The Flats” is barely visible. Photo by Meg Upton

Properties cited for violating weed and debris ordinance during fire season

It doesn’t take much to start a fire in our present dry drought climate. The fire on Lee Road in East Quincy gave a perfect example of the importance of eradicating weeds and debris from town properties.

In the area of Greenville known as “The Flats,” five property owners have been served with letters from the Indian Valley Community Services District for allegedly violating Ordinance 6.02.050 — which sets out requirements for the removal of fire hazards such as weeds and debris from the premises.

The property owners have until Aug. 24 to comply with the ordinance. At the September IVCSD board meeting, directors will have a resolution to consider on weed abatement. For property owners that do not comply, tax liens against the properties could be next.

Some of the properties look abandoned and some are in foreclosure. Some properties are inhabited by senior citizens, who might not have the resources to remove the dried grasses and debris. All have at least knee high weeds and several have flammable debris in the yards.

There is also one property in Taylorsville that received a notice to remove weeds and debris.

Residents have been vocal on the need for removal. “We don’t want to go up in flames. A fire could sweep right through here in seconds,” said Dottie Preston about the problem. She indicated that in the past, the county had sent people out to cite property owners giving them 30 days to comply.

The protocol through the IVCSD means non-compliance could run through fire season, with concerned neighbors having to just hope that nothing bad will happen.

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22 thoughts on “Properties cited for violating weed and debris ordinance during fire season

  • August 14, 2018 at 8:32 am
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    “We don’t want to go up in flames. A fire could sweep right through here in seconds,” said Dottie Preston”
    Then move to the desert you statist. Stop bringing city think to the country and empowering more intrusion of private property.

    • August 15, 2018 at 9:30 am
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      Why is it that people who post such ad hominem attacks are too often not courageous enough to share their name? A big mouth behind a keyboard is a fascinating subject in our contemporary culture.

    • August 19, 2018 at 2:22 pm
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      Agree and The county has obligations to trim the grass along the roadways and haven’t on manybof our roads and when asked they say their mower is broken.. well perhaps these people’s mowers ar broken.. this whole thing rubs me the wrong way!

  • August 14, 2018 at 8:59 am
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    The Plumas County Fire Safe Council has a long standing well managed program to assist senior and disabled citizens, who may lack the physical or fiscal ability, to create defensible space. 283-0829. Excellent opportunity for Meg to write about the successes of that program as a follow up.

    • August 14, 2018 at 10:35 am
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      I was just going to ask what resources are in place to help the senior citizens they mentioned. Thank you.

    • August 14, 2018 at 12:48 pm
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      Nope. It is their way or the highway. One must accept their plan totally. I had pallets that I use to stack firewood. They refused to help because of pallets.

  • August 14, 2018 at 11:31 am
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    The Flats are at risk for a fire and not just for weeds. So Meanwhile “Intrusion” you should be allowed to let your property overgrow with weeds, tall grass and other vegetation, piles of crap and vehicles to your hearts content so that it can become a fire and/or public heath and safety hazard then? With all that has happened with wild fires in this State, yours is such an self-serving and asinine comment. You have no more rites than any other resident. We all have rites to protect our safety and way of life too. I’m no fan of big government but only you are accountable for your inaction or stupidity. You don’t care about anyone but yourself, OK, way to go. Better hope one of your neighbors will care about you if you ever need it.

  • August 14, 2018 at 12:56 pm
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    Firesafe is a great idea but … Where do I start? I have only a couple of acres that I work hard to maintain defensible space. A neighboring parcel with an absentee owner is an overgrown nightmare of a fire bomb. More of same down the road. Somr USFS property has many dead trees nearby. Where is the enforcement?

    There is no viable place to take cuttings and slash but to the dumps. As a low income senior I have so far spent $150 on dump fees cutting badly into my food budget. Firesafe council had a day or two of chipping – not enough! Their policy if their way or the highway is ridiculous. Millions spent by state and Sierra Institute on biofuel installation and proposals but still, Greenville area is a mega fire waiting to happen.

  • August 14, 2018 at 12:59 pm
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    Instead of spending millions on biofuel plants how about a simple solution. One truck and chipper that has a scheduled route through county to be available to residents for their cuttings and slash. Year round availability would make all the difference to homeowners trying to be firesafe. Since it is there, chipped material could be utilized at the new biofuel plant in Quincy. We need simple effective solutions that make us firesafe now!

      • August 14, 2018 at 6:56 pm
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        Instead of spending millions on biofuel plants how about a simple solution. One truck and chipper that has a scheduled route through county to be available to residents for their cuttings and slash. Year round availability would make all the difference to homeowners trying to be firesafe. Since it is there, chipped material could be utilized at the new biofuel plant in Quincy. We need simple effective solutions that make us firesafe now!

      • August 14, 2018 at 6:57 pm
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        2 days in our area? Not near enough!

      • August 14, 2018 at 7:46 pm
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        I stand corrected. I was looking at 2017 schedule I guess where chipping was very limited. I am sending my application. Hope it happens timely because drying limbs in side of road are a big fire hazard. Thanks for the link.

  • August 14, 2018 at 3:11 pm
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    Mike, the general public can’t be trusted to use the chipper properly. It would have to manned by County Personnel (probably additional staff) to prevent crap that shouldn’t go in it. Or a member of the public getting hurt because they don’t know what they are doing. Then opening up the County to law suits. Who’s going to pay for that, the County Dept Budget is already stressed. Your simple effective solution cost money. Think your simple solution through a little further, some times they aren’t so simple as we might think they are.

    • August 14, 2018 at 5:02 pm
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      Exactly. We as a county have to do whatever it takes to do it right! With over a $100,000,000 budget I think that if the powers that be really don’t want us to burn, they will do this. Is there the political will? That’s the question.

      • August 15, 2018 at 9:32 am
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        “Political will”? How about property owner responsibility?

  • August 14, 2018 at 3:55 pm
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    Mike,
    BTW;
    1) The County spent 400K for the Biomass the rest came from grants and other funding contributors.
    2) It is projected to save the County 40K a year in heating costs (10 year pay back)
    3) It is suppose to take the green waste from Plumas County Fire Safe Council. So…. your yard waste that you want the County to buy a truck, chipper and hire personnel to get rid of for you and other residents. maybe you should talk to the Plumas County Fire Safe Council. 283-0829

    (Feather River News 8/14/17)

    • August 14, 2018 at 6:43 pm
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      LOL. CK previous comment about firesafe council.

    • August 14, 2018 at 6:47 pm
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      Well we will see how that works out! Plenty of progressive communities around the nation provide this service. Plumas can do it too!

  • August 14, 2018 at 6:43 pm
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    Ironic that the county owns more abondoned vehicles than anybody else living in the county. Pot, meet kettle.

  • August 14, 2018 at 6:44 pm
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    Meanwhile, clean your yard.

  • August 14, 2018 at 9:31 pm
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    I can show you dozens of lots that look exactly like this that belong to the county. For example the water pumping station on the bike trail in Quincy they must have 3 acres and only half of it is cleared the rest is Sierra Nevada cow peas and 5′ tall dried grass. Bunch of hypocrites out there.

Comments are closed.