Plumas News

Plumas County News

Trail stewardship updates county on rewards of partnership

The Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has made unprecedented progress in turning Plumas County into a destination outdoor recreation location. Since its inception in 2003, the little nonprofit that now has a million-dollar budget has provided access to trails that the county could only dream about.

Greg Williams, the executive director of the stewardship, presented a snapshot of the organization’s progress to the Plumas County Board of Supervisors at the regular board meeting Feb. 13.

“It is a pretty impressive organization,” said District 5 Supervisor Jeff Engel. “They have done some pretty amazing things.”

With over 40 employees, 1 million hits on social media, government grants and partnerships, and world-renowned events, Williams put it lightly when he said, “Our little community voice is getting bigger.”

The trail stewardship specializes in cultivating appealing trails that mountain bikers from all over the country can’t resist. It is not just mountain bikers who get to enjoy the developing trails system; hikers, equestrians and off-road vehicles can also participate on the trails. It is the mountain biking community that flocks to the events that the stewardship hosts. Events like the Grinduro in Quincy and the Downieville Classic are predicted to bring at least 1,000 people to each event.

Part of the organization’s funding has been with grants from Off-Road Vehicle funding from the state. In order to receive the funding, the county had acted as the governing agency.

The stewardship has received almost $1.2 million in funds from OHV grants that have gone toward items that are difficult to fund with grants, like employee wages.

Williams said the goal is to create a web of interlocking trails that can encourage recreational travel throughout Plumas County, even connecting the trails to Reno and Susanville.

“Thanks for believing in us and partnering with us on these grants,” said Williams.