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Like the series of paintings America Little will display at Plumas Arts Gallery during the month of September, “The Red Flower is whatever a red flower may mean to a single person. We all may see it as the stereotypical red rose for love, but it can also mean courage or passion. It is all based on your interpretation of it.”

Plumas Arts Gallery hosts artist’s reception this Friday

The Plumas Arts Gallery, at 525 Main St. in Quincy, will host a reception Friday, Sept. 6, from 5 to 7 p.m., showcasing work by dozens of members of artists and featuring paintings by America Little.

Little decided to be an artist at “a very young age and just stuck with it.”

“Growing up in Plumas County there is always an inspiration in all the nature around, so I feel that our natural surroundings are always a subject you see around the county and in the windows of our town. As an artist growing up around here, I wanted to be the one who created something completely different. So instead of painting the nature around me, I was inspired to paint what was in my mind,” said Little.

At Quincy High School, arts teacher Danielle Frid helped America understand that she wanted to be a teacher “because I liked being in that classroom setting.” Being a 6th-grade counselor reinforced that decision as she found that she “loved hanging out with that age group and just being there while they were learning.”

In her time in the Feather River College Art Department, artist and instructor Rafael Blanco “was a big inspiration to my artistic career because he helped really push my boundaries in my skills and showed me how good I could really be.”

“Other than wanting to be the black sheep of my art community, I was very inspired by my grandmother’s flowers. Growing up she always had the most beautiful flowers surrounding her house. I would always be excited about going up to her house to see that her peonies or roses were about to bloom or have finally bloomed. I think that it what has inspired me the most to paint, seeing all the colors coming up in her yard and wanting to show how they made me feel and the effect they have had on my life.”

In her Artist Statement about her gallery show she offers: “What does a flower mean to you?

What does color mean to you?

It could be multiple things or not a lot.

Maybe you don’t acknowledge the color that hit your eye or even realize what color you are most attracted to. A flower you might just think of as a filler to your garden or something really pretty but don’t think of it much as something significant other than knowing it has a purpose in the world to attract our important bees, or they are just an easy gift.

But flowers and colors can mean multiple things to multiple people.”

Within the series of paintings that will form America’s exhibition “the symbolism of the red rose are the indications of love and passion, but in others there is the room for the viewer’s interpretation of the work.

That it also what The Red Flower is all about, said America, “Just seeing it in your way, and having a personal connection to it. It is anything to anyone, it is a life experience.”

Plumas Arts Gallery and office hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., or by appointment.

For more information about the work of Plumas Arts visit plumasarts.org or call the gallery at 283-3402.

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