Jack Patton, 9, and his younger brother, Saun, 6, wait to dig into their choice of many yummy flavors. While Jack chose vanilla in a waffle cone, Saun chose something far more adventurous. Photo by Victoria Metcalf

Sweet treats on a summer day

By Victoria Metcalf

Special to Plumas News

Saun Patton was excited about receiving a generous scoop of ice cream from Matthew Kitchens one of the owners of the Toy Store and Ice Cream place in Quincy. Photo by Victoria Metcalf

Ice cream and summer seem to go together like a hand and a scoop this year especially.

That’s what father Dave and son Matthew Kitchens are experiencing this summer as they’re scooping up mounds of rich, creamy ice cream. And the cold, sweet treat comes in enough flavors to tempt even the most jaded appetite.

As the three-year-old addition to the Toy Store in Quincy continues to serve up traditional cones, waffle cones and cups of Hock Family Ice Cream from Minden, NV., the owners claim to have sold more than 400 gallons in two-and-a-half months.

And the leading favorite flavor by far is Cookies n’ Cream.

The second choice is a new one especially handmade from an old Dutch cookie recipe, called Spealas explained Matthew last Friday, Aug. 7.

And number three on the flavor menu is Unicorn Rainbow Sherbet, Dave added as he prepared a wrapped gift for another customer.

 The delightful thing about Hock Ice Cream — besides the taste — is that it is all-handmade, Matthew said.

That doesn’t mean that the Hock family does it by hand in an old fashioned crank machine. What it does mean is there is a person associated with each individual machine throughout the process.

Besides natural ingredients, Dave said there is real cream in each batch. That means that it is 15 to 20 percent fat and that’s what gives it that delightfully creamy-rich flavor and texture, Matthew added.

If the makers are creating blueberry ice cream then they use real blueberries in every batch, Dave emphasized.

Matthew said that each year they’ve seen their ice cream side-business grow. But this year with the threat of COVID-19 it has grown more than ever.

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