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Shooting in Chester

According to the Plumas County Sheriff’s Office, a 23-year-old man shot two men after they forced entry into his residence on Farrar Drive and began assaulting him and another individual with fists and a baton at 4:45 a.m. on Saturday morning. One of those shot was listed in critical condition at Enloe Medical Center in Chico, while the other was treated and released at Banner Lassen Medical Center in Susanville, at which time he was arrested and booked into the Plumas County jail. The two victims at the residence were treated at Seneca Hospital for serious injuries. During an interview Sunday morning, Sheriff Greg Hagwood said that a party had been going on at the residence, when a man was asked to leave. He returned with another man and forced entry, and that’s when the altercation began.

6 thoughts on “Shooting in Chester

  • can you report the address on Farrar? my family used to live on that street for many years.

    • Why would they release the address? lol

  • Haha…it’s not like no one knows where and who was involved…everyone knows it’s just another druggie incident…always involves the same group of people…

  • This is not a drug problem only alchahol so get off the drug scene and get into the real world dummy

    • It is the hardest hit county in California’s opioid crisis.

      Plumas County, home to the small towns of Quincy and Graeagle among others, has a population of 18,000 people — but has prescriptions for more than 19,000 painkillers.

      A few years ago the county’s health department started to notice a trend in the causes of death on death certificates coming into their office: drug overdoses.

      The county didn’t have a heroin problem, though, they had a prescription problem.

      Yeah, no drug problems here….

      Helen, you must have been high when typing your comment.

  • It is the hardest hit county in California’s opioid crisis.

    Plumas County, home to the small towns of Quincy and Graeagle among others, has a population of 18,000 people — but has prescriptions for more than 19,000 painkillers.

    A few years ago the county’s health department started to notice a trend in the causes of death on death certificates coming into their office: drug overdoses.

    The county didn’t have a heroin problem, though, they had a prescription problem.

    Yeah, no drug problems here….

    Helen, you must have been high when typing your comment.

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