Click one of the flags below to view the full newspaper.


Firefighters are firing to strengthen containment lines and increase a buffer by providing depth Sept. 12 along the 176 Road near Antelope Lake. The strategy worked and the lines held during the Sept. 15 winds. Photo by USFS

Walker Fire Day 13

7 :15 p.m, Sept. 16: The rain worked its magic and the fire is now 95 percent contained!

9:10 a.m., Sept. 16: All evacuation orders due to the Walker Fire have been lifted in Plumas and Lassen counties.

7:30 a.m., Sept. 16: The Walker Fire is now listed as 54,518 acres with 68 percent containment. The fire broke out 11 miles east of Taylorsville on Sept. 4. Incident command is pleased that the fire perimeter, which fire crews had worked diligently to fortify over the past few days, held during yesterday’s anticipated winds. Thunderstorms are anticipated along with the rain today and should end by this evening. Another drying period is expected to follow on Tuesday with a chance of rain again on Wednesday.

According to this morning’s 6 a.m. briefing: Last night firefighters mopped up and patrolled the perimeter of the fire to ensure the fire stayed within containment lines the winds remained moderate. Crews mopped up two spot fires from yesterday’s activity on the south side of the fire. Both of these spot fires have been fully contained.

The Stony Fire, a new fire which started yesterday, three miles north of the Walker Fire near Clarks Peak, was held at one acre with containment line all around it. This success was due to the rapid detection and response of the Plumas National Forest and designated initial attack fire personnel from the Walker Fire. The cause of this new fire is under investigation.

Priorities for today and tonight are to monitor the fire perimeter as the rains arrive. Large trees will retain heat for a long time and can threaten the fireline if it has a chance to dry out again. Crews will continue to control erosion from the fire suppression activities, working with resource advisors to prevent damage to riparian and archaeological areas. Firefighters will be removing fire suppression equipment in areas where it is no longer needed.

 

Click here to submit a letter to the editor about this post that will be published in our newspaper.